About your Search

20130318
20130318
STATION
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
MSNBCW 4
CNNW 1
KQED (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
that was open to conservative views, particularly on foreign policy and some domestic issues. it was much more electric than at this time is now. now it is another liberal magazine. >> i want to show you an ad that was in the publication in 2007. well let's see if you remember this ad. on the screen, all aboard, enjoy seven days and night on the aalso can coast with your favorite weekly standard pundits, june 16-23, 200. special private programs and receptions. on and on. like-mind conservatives. what was the impact of that cruise on american politics? >> sure. well i think the discovery of sarah palin was one thing. on the cruise, we went up there in southern -- we were not up around anchorage in that part of alaska, but we were mr. we went to juno and so on. in juno, we were invited by the governor to have lunch at her house in the governor's mansion. he found out later this came about because the woman who was the head of the alaska federation of republican women or whatever the title is and had told the governor's space that we were coming and, at first, she was ignored. she told them agai
that in that foreign policy matters, colin powell will be my chief adviser. i would think that would be a smart move. this is a decent fella who served this country well, and i think that would be, i mean if you are asking do i think he would be a great secretary of state? you bet. >> mr. barnes? >> that was good question. that was one of the better once i asked. >> what would you say today about colin powell? >> oh, well, who? george bush. >> yeah. >> he would probably say the same thing. certainly there is a rift between them over foreign policy and it opened up while powell was still his secretary of state. >> twitter. fred barnes is on twitter. why? >> my son has convinced me that i have to be on twitter. don't tweet much. but i tweet occasionally. i tweet maybe once a week, ebbs sent for my son nicely will tweet my articles. he sends those out. >> what does he do? >> my son worked for kevin mccarthy, the republican whip in the house of representatives and was, until recently, a floor assistant, the job he loved. >> all right. twitter. i will read some of the twitter messages that you sent out.
to offer as president on foreign policy. one of the things i have to say that richard nixon is he believed in the big play, or you call it a hail mary pass. he was willing to take huge risks. not all presidents are will do that. detente with th the soviet union with 20. so get a lot to offer presidents. but i do believe, i know this for a fact, there was an effort to make it difficult was it takes to become available. richard nixon, richard nixon by the way was totally in his right to assume that the tapes belonged to him. because every president until richard nixon owned their papers. the national archives didn't know that there were kennedy tapes until, until the nixon tape were released and the kennedy family dental the nation archives, you know that safe in the warehouse which we only have teased? there are tapes there. the national archives didn't know. and so president kennedy, president johnson and president nixon assumed that the tapes they were making would belong to them. well, when president nixon cut a deal, with the overseer of the national archives to try to get back to tapes
. obama has the right answers to foreign policy challenges around the world. and our power player of the week. a celebrity chef combines the classic with the cutting edge. all right now on "fox news sunday." >> chris: hello again and happy st. patrick's day from fox news in washington. the president met with republicans and democrats in both the house and senate this week. but for all of the talk of a grand bar gain there was no sign the two parties are any closer to bridging the divide over our nation's debt. we want to discuss the chances for a deal with two key senators. dick durbin the senate's number two democrat joins us from chicago. tennessee republican bob corker is in chattanooga. gentlemen, while the president was meeting with members of congress, house republicans and senate democrats put out their budget plans which had dramatic differences. let's take a look at them. the gop plan would cut the deficit $4.6 trillion over ten years, all through spending cuts. the democratic plan would cut the deficit $1.8 trillion half through spending cuts and half through tax hikes.
there was a role in america's foreign policy. he wants america to pull back. he pointed to a split within the republican party on national security before almost anybody else did. he really actually outlined some of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move
the timelines regarding iran? in covering the pentagon and foreign policy. elizabeth, you know we have a different u.s. officials have a different notion of when we reach that danger point. the testimony last week was that the ayatollah has still not made the political decision to proceed with nuclear weapons. there's not that same sense at all in israel. >> i feel like i've been talking about this for years. the different timelines. but yes, there's still a different timeline that the u.s., i think the last thing the president said was about a year, israel thinks it's sooner than that. the reality is that israel is going to be in a very difficult position to do a strike itself. we've been through that many times it doesn't have the same capabilities the united states does and the united states is it going to wait until the last possible minute there was a lot of fighting last fall as you remember, about the president not being strong enough, against on iran. that has died down. there's a new israeli government and it's a little bit more moderate. so we're still in the same place. >> a
. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he had two brothers who died of tuberculosis so there wasn't very good health care. one brother was 7-years-old, six or seven and then his older brother died when he was 25 and so she was -- so he was very much an internationalist and nixon was a big supporter of the marshall plan and voted for it and a lot of his sestak e
: julie senator graham says this is quote, an exhibit a of a failed foreign policy and this is why the president allegedly doesn't want the people to come forward. bin laden is on the run, and al-qaeda is alive and well and benghazi, and how the people were allegedly begging for help. and we know that about the ambassador and apparently these people would back up-- >> and senator graham has to create the anti-obama to-- that's not what it's about at all. >> i would caution you and say this, senator graham can allege what it wants and white house can allege what it wants. the more lessons drawn from this the better. the more testimony from congress is the better. and if it's done privately without jeopardizing the covert operatives i'm for it. instead of trotting out on the sunday talk shows where senator graham is trying to burnish his bona fides, as opposed to going out there and-- >> how much more can he do? >> he can't prove this? >> senator graham is a whistle blower. >> he can't proof anything. >> he's to get what he's entitled to. the president doesn't seem to honor or respec
.s. ambassador to israel, now vice president and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key po
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
of the president's bigger failures on foreign policy of the first term in office. though it's a failure that he didn't necessarily have a lot of control over. at the beginning of his first term, the president declared with great fanfare he wouldn't follow the lead of his predecessors presidents clinton and bush and wait until a second term to push for middle east peace. >> we're not going to wait until the end of my administration to deal with palestinian and israeli peace. we're going to start now. >> instead, not only did the peace process go nowhere, it's actually taken a step back. when the president sets off for israel on tuesday, he travels with very low expectations. that's probably the bit of good news. from the outset the president pressed israel hard on what a two-state solution would look like. >> israelis must acknowledge that just as israel's right to exist cannot be denied, neither can palestine's. the united states does not accept the legitimacy of continued israeli settlements. it is time for these settlements to stop. >> president obama's relationship with israeli prime ministe
at this podium and talk about foreign policy issues but i'm glad to be here today to talk about this diplomatic campaign in pakistan and afghanistan. i want to say one of the good things about speaking to a washington audience, when jessica goes through the jobs you've had everyone goes uh-huh, uh-huh. >> i was somewhere speaking and someone said here is ambassador grossman. i want to say what a pleasure it is to see so many people here in the audience who i have had the great benefit of learning from for many years. without drawing any distinctions i hope you'll allow me three. i started my career in pakistan junior to 1979 as a officer and howy was a boss of mine. i see ambassador hugh sane as the first a foreign diplomat i ever had to meet and do business with. i'm glad to see you. simon henderson was a stringer for a number of very important pub bli indications then and he taught me a lot of about journalism. i know there are others this in this room as well. those three take me back to 1979.1978 and we'll see what you say when this is over. what i want to do stod take up the offer that i
foreign policy. each case is treated as an isolated situation. look at this itinerary, what he has planned there is not much to improve the relationship with the israeli government in a content level. martha: president obama has said we are not sort of this super power that we used to be in many ways. the world has changed, right? so there is an opportunity here to be a leader, in terms of israel. to go to israel, doug and say look nothing has changed in this relationship we are steadfast in our support of israel, which of course he has said but some people feel the meaning behind it hasn't been as forceful as in the past. >> i agree with you, martha, if he goes and does that and i fully expect he will, that is an important state. standing with our only stable democratic ally in the middle east is hugely important given the unrest in egypt and throughout the region. i think that clarifying positions on iran, the red line and what we're prepared to do and where we've prepared to do it is critically important. i'm glad he's willing to do that even if it's limited to just that. martha: look a
direction, that the appeal of a nonintervention in foreign- policy is really picking up's read. rand paul stop by national review and he is a charismatic figure. that matters in politics. we saw his speech here and elsewhere that this is a guy who resonates on the floor and i think he has a bright future in republican politics. >> did john mccain revised his remark? i did not know that. >> he apologized. >> good for him. he was jealous that someone could stand up for 12 hours without urinating. >> rand paul had help with other folks. i agree with the fact that we ought to be putting pressure on the justice department and the administration to come forward with a lot of clearances. what was your take on it? >> given the situation he's in, many conservatives -- his father could walk into a room and rand is the opposite. rand looks for ways to diffuse the situation. people who have served in politics understand how important that is. i had the privilege of going with rand paul and his wife and two of his sons to israel right outside of jordan in january. what i saw was amazing politician. a
those ones relative to foreign policy end up sometimes driving the most passionate dust up. but look, we have four great senators that you've mentioned there. they all have very differing ideas. they are all part of our caucus and bring a lot to it. i think it's time to move on and focus on those things that unite us. look, i really do think it's healthy that people are being as outspoken as they are right now, and hopefully that will lead to some unification down the road. >> senator corker, always good to have you here in "the situation room." thank you. >> thank you. >>> there are very few places left in new york where you can smoke them, and now mayor michael bloomberg wants to make it so you can't see them. up next, controversy over his plan to force stores to hide cigarettes. i don't make any decisions about who to hire without going to angie's list first. you'll find reviews on home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. with angie's list, i know who to call, and i know the results will be fantastic. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. >>> he's gone after trans f
's foreign policy cognizenti, can't seem to draw the obvious conclusions, stop letting these karzai guys play us as suckers and speed up our exit and stop wasting american lives and dollars. that is not very diplomatic but comes from the former head here and probably, as you probably know what a fair number of people think. is that the right prescription? in other words, he is going beyond something that you're talking about. >> it is pretty close except for some of the rhetoric because i don't think we're wasting lives and dollars there. i think we have had a mission. that mission was to remove of the taliban from control of afghanistan. and it was to try to provide the afghan security forces with the numbers and the capabilities, the skills, that they need to prevent the taliban from taking control again. that mission has, for the most part successful militarily. the part which will help to sustain it which is to have a government in afghanistan which is less corrupt, has not been as successful. but it's, nonetheless i think, going to leave afghanistan and we're not going to totally leave i
and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic setting. >> people for symbolic purposes. >> joe doesn't like paper money either. he wants to get rid of the dollar bill. >> we are into a bartering system at the scarborough house. >> you got a problem saying we should rebrand the party. it's a little whacko. nothing wrong with being a little whacko. >> can you admit your party is a little whacko? >> absolutely! there is extremists on both sides but if you put a bunch of people in a room, can you say that too and they did this weekend. >> left wing activists in a room? so outnumbered. makes me sad. >>> how to turn your child into a better student. dr. david satcher will be here and alexis glick with a report on that. also with us -- ♪ >> i tried to recover here from the way we started but we end the block badly too. also with us is chuck todd and the "the washington post" eugene robinson. up next a look at the top stories and the politico pl playbook. >>> in new england and mid-atlantic, winter forecast a lot of you with a snow day throughout tuesday. isn't so much today
levin. he'll be speaking at the council on foreign relations on u.s. defense policy issues. life coverage begins at 12:30 eastern again here on c-span2. and the u.s. house and senate return today to consider continuing funding for the federal government past march 27th when current funding expires. they're also expected to work on their respective budget plans for fiscal year 204. the house back at 2 p.m. for legislative business. floor debate likely while members wait for the senate to ask. also the senate in at 3 p.m. --2 p.m. eastern. and then hoping to move on to the 2014 budget resolution, and they hope to get it approved before by the end of the week before the easter recess. life coverage of the house, as usual, on c-span and, of course, the senate right here on c-span2. ..2 last week endorsed a review of military roles to allow seniors to manage overturns sexual assault victims. testified before the senate armed services subcommittee on personnel. >> i am incredibly grateful that many of you came this morning and listened to the first two panels. that means a great deal,
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)